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Campos de la muerte: el infierno que viven los refugiados en las islas griegas

Campos de la muerte: el infierno que viven los refugiados en las islas griegas
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La organización Médicos Sin Fronteras denunció al Gobierno de Grecia por la emergencia humanitaria que se vive en el campo de Moria, en la Isla de Lesbos, el mayor centro de refugiados en Europa. Aquí hay más de 140 niños con enfermedades crónicas, complejas y potencialmente mortales que no están recibiendo la atención médica que necesitan.

El campo de Moria tiene capacidad para 3.000 personas y ya son 20.000 los indocumentados y solicitantes de asilo que viven hacinados en este lugar, entre malas condiciones de higiene, agua sucia y basura por todas partes.

© Foto : Gentileza Médicos Sin Fronteras/Anna Pantelia“My son, Mohammed, is almost 3 years old and is suffering from brain disorders. Due to the disease he is having contant headaches and he doesn’t talk much… we try to make him talk but whenever he tries he mumbles. At the moment we live in a tent in the olive grove without electivity and heating. The toilets and the showers are far and there is no warm for bathing him so I only wash him once every two weeks. The doctor suggest us to keep good hygiene but it’s impossible. We try to keep our tent clean but when it rains there is everywhere mud. As a mother, I don’t even care about myself, I only care about my children. When Mohammed complains about the headaches he has due to the disease I know I can do nothing to help him, I only cry. We are here 3,5 months and all the doctors who saw Mohammed here say that he really need to be transferred to mainland in order to receive care for his disease but are still here in Moria”. *Gul, from Afghanistan, mother of 2 living in the Olive Groove in Moria. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
El campo de Moria alberga más de 20.000 refugiados - Sputnik Mundo
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“My son, Mohammed, is almost 3 years old and is suffering from brain disorders. Due to the disease he is having contant headaches and he doesn’t talk much… we try to make him talk but whenever he tries he mumbles. At the moment we live in a tent in the olive grove without electivity and heating. The toilets and the showers are far and there is no warm for bathing him so I only wash him once every two weeks. The doctor suggest us to keep good hygiene but it’s impossible. We try to keep our tent clean but when it rains there is everywhere mud. As a mother, I don’t even care about myself, I only care about my children. When Mohammed complains about the headaches he has due to the disease I know I can do nothing to help him, I only cry. We are here 3,5 months and all the doctors who saw Mohammed here say that he really need to be transferred to mainland in order to receive care for his disease but are still here in Moria”. *Gul, from Afghanistan, mother of 2 living in the Olive Groove in Moria. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
© Foto : Gentileza Médicos Sin Fronteras/Anna Pantelia“My daughter Zahra is suffering from autism and mental issues. In the place we live there is no water and almost no electricity. There is not enough place for her to play. This situation is very very very difficult for Zahra. I want a place where my daughter can play like other kids and a place that she can be seen by a good doctor.” Shamseyeh, 23 from Afghanistan. “Sometimes due to the cold weather and because we have nothing to keep warm she gets seizures in the middle of the night.” She continues. Zahra is just 6 year old and she is suffering from autism and mental issues. She is living with her parents in Moria in a small compartment within a room shared with tens of asylum seekers with no regular electricity and no privacy. Toilets and water taps are shared. In the island there is no specialized care that Zahra needs for her condition to be improved while the living conditions are affecting her wellbeing. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
En campo de Moria hay más de 140 niños enfermos que necesitan atención en hospitales - Sputnik Mundo
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“My daughter Zahra is suffering from autism and mental issues. In the place we live there is no water and almost no electricity. There is not enough place for her to play. This situation is very very very difficult for Zahra. I want a place where my daughter can play like other kids and a place that she can be seen by a good doctor.” Shamseyeh, 23 from Afghanistan. “Sometimes due to the cold weather and because we have nothing to keep warm she gets seizures in the middle of the night.” She continues. Zahra is just 6 year old and she is suffering from autism and mental issues. She is living with her parents in Moria in a small compartment within a room shared with tens of asylum seekers with no regular electricity and no privacy. Toilets and water taps are shared. In the island there is no specialized care that Zahra needs for her condition to be improved while the living conditions are affecting her wellbeing. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
© Foto : Gentileza Médicos Sin Fronteras/Anna Pantelia“The hospital here told me that there is no specialized care for my son, Abdul, here and that we should be transferred to a bigger hospital. I have a child who is sick, he’s totally paralyzed he is epileptic and he can’t even sleep. So far no one is able to help me here. I am a (single) mother with another 3 children and we are stuck in Lesbos.” Raido is a 27 year-old single mother of 4 from Somalia. She lived 3,5 months with her children in Moria camp and for the last 3 months she is living in an apartment near Moria. Her husband died before she took the decision to come to Greece. She receives no help for her paralyzed child and in Lesbos island there is no specialized doctor to help her child. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
 Médicos Sin Fronteras reclama que niños con enfermedades graves sean trasladados - Sputnik Mundo
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“The hospital here told me that there is no specialized care for my son, Abdul, here and that we should be transferred to a bigger hospital. I have a child who is sick, he’s totally paralyzed he is epileptic and he can’t even sleep. So far no one is able to help me here. I am a (single) mother with another 3 children and we are stuck in Lesbos.” Raido is a 27 year-old single mother of 4 from Somalia. She lived 3,5 months with her children in Moria camp and for the last 3 months she is living in an apartment near Moria. Her husband died before she took the decision to come to Greece. She receives no help for her paralyzed child and in Lesbos island there is no specialized doctor to help her child. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
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“My son, Mohammed, is almost 3 years old and is suffering from brain disorders. Due to the disease he is having contant headaches and he doesn’t talk much… we try to make him talk but whenever he tries he mumbles. At the moment we live in a tent in the olive grove without electivity and heating. The toilets and the showers are far and there is no warm for bathing him so I only wash him once every two weeks. The doctor suggest us to keep good hygiene but it’s impossible. We try to keep our tent clean but when it rains there is everywhere mud. As a mother, I don’t even care about myself, I only care about my children. When Mohammed complains about the headaches he has due to the disease I know I can do nothing to help him, I only cry. We are here 3,5 months and all the doctors who saw Mohammed here say that he really need to be transferred to mainland in order to receive care for his disease but are still here in Moria”. *Gul, from Afghanistan, mother of 2 living in the Olive Groove in Moria. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
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“My daughter Zahra is suffering from autism and mental issues. In the place we live there is no water and almost no electricity. There is not enough place for her to play. This situation is very very very difficult for Zahra. I want a place where my daughter can play like other kids and a place that she can be seen by a good doctor.” Shamseyeh, 23 from Afghanistan. “Sometimes due to the cold weather and because we have nothing to keep warm she gets seizures in the middle of the night.” She continues. Zahra is just 6 year old and she is suffering from autism and mental issues. She is living with her parents in Moria in a small compartment within a room shared with tens of asylum seekers with no regular electricity and no privacy. Toilets and water taps are shared. In the island there is no specialized care that Zahra needs for her condition to be improved while the living conditions are affecting her wellbeing. At the moment there are more than 19.000 people living in Moria camp which was initially made to host 3.000 people. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.
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“The hospital here told me that there is no specialized care for my son, Abdul, here and that we should be transferred to a bigger hospital. I have a child who is sick, he’s totally paralyzed he is epileptic and he can’t even sleep. So far no one is able to help me here. I am a (single) mother with another 3 children and we are stuck in Lesbos.” Raido is a 27 year-old single mother of 4 from Somalia. She lived 3,5 months with her children in Moria camp and for the last 3 months she is living in an apartment near Moria. Her husband died before she took the decision to come to Greece. She receives no help for her paralyzed child and in Lesbos island there is no specialized doctor to help her child. For the past 4 months MSF doctors have seen at least 140 children with chronic and complex cases who have no access to medication and the specialized care they need. Some of them if they left untreated they might face life-long consequences or even death.

Médicos sin Fronteras calcula que hay una ducha por cada 506 personas y un inodoro por cada 210. Las personas deben hacer colas de horas para ir al baño, para comer o para ser atendidos por un médico. La situación es más grave aún para los más de 140 niños enfermos que precisan ser atendidos en un hospital.

"Estos niños necesitan urgentemente ser trasladados a la Grecia continental o a otros países de la Unión Europea para recibir atención médica especializada. Hay algunos con diabetes, otros con problemas del sistema inmunitario, con epilepsia grave, malformaciones cardíacas, parálisis, hasta un niño con cáncer", dijo a Sputnik Tommaso Santo, coordinador general de Médicos sin Fronteras en Grecia.

La isla de Lesbos, ubicada a pocos kilómetros de la costa turca, se ha convertido en la puerta de entrada a Europa para miles de personas que huyen de los conflictos bélicos en sus países de orígen. La mayoría provienen de Afganistán, pero también llegan desde Siria, Irak, Congo y Ghana, entre otros.

Òscar Camps, fundador de la ONG catalana Proactiva Open Arms - Sputnik Mundo
Fundador de Open Arms denuncia complot de la UE para impedir llegada de migrantes
"La estrategia del Gobierno es contener a estas personas en la Isla, como si fuera una pequeña prisión a cielo abierto, y no dejarlos llegar a Grecia. También realizan una política de disuasión para transmitir el mensaje de que esto es lo que les espera, aquí no es el paraíso que vieron en la televisión", añadió Santo.

Desde Médicos sin Fronteras trabajan en el campo de Moria para brindar atención primaria pediátrica en una pequeña clínica, donde reciben unas 130 consultas diarias. También tienen otro hospital donde atienden problemas de salud mental.

"Una de las consecuencias más graves de estas políticas de contención son las enfermedades mentales. Tenemos pacientes psicóticos que tiene un trauma por todo lo que han vivido, por el viaje. Y otros que desarrollan estos problemas aquí, es decir, que llegan bien y se enferman por las condiciones en las que los dejamos", concluyó el coordinador general de Médicos sin Fronteras en Grecia.

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